"A Scout is never taken by surprise; he knows exactly what to do when anything unexpected happens."

- Lord Robert Baden-Powell

A Scout is Prepared.  It's the Scout's Motto and for good reason. 

Gradually, as each scout develops, from LIONS (Kindergarten) to WEBELOS (5th grade), each scout learns the basic skills needed to be, stay and keep other safe in unforeseen circumstances. Scout leaders and families help each scout achieve these skills that are essential for life. Learn and practice "Emergency Preparedness" constantly, and you too will be ready to respond when needed. 

Nothing beats IN-PERSON TRAINING, no matter what we are trying to learn.  But for quick starting and orientation, here are some important websites we like to use online to begin the process:

Animal Kingdom

  1. Learn the role of someone who provides a service to your community.

  2. Demonstrate you know what to do in an emergency.

  3. Choose two energy saving projects to practice in your home for two weeks.

  4. Participate in a Lion den family service project for others.

Lions

First Responder

(Webelos Handbook, pg. 42)

Do all of these:

  1. Explain what first aid is. Tell what you should do after an accident.

  2. Show what to do for the hurry cases of first aid:
    a. Serious bleeding
    b. Heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest
    c. Stopped breathing
    d. Stroke
    e. Poisoning

  3. Show how to help a choking victim.

  4. Show how to treat for shock.

  5. Demonstrate that you know how to treat the following:
    a. Cuts and scratches
    b. Burns and scalds
    c. Sunburn
    d. Blisters on the hand and foot
    e. Tick bites
    f. Bites and stings of other insects
    g. Venomous snakebite
    h. Nosebleed
    i. Frostbite

  6. Put together a simple home first-aid kit. Explain what you included and how to use each item correctly.

  7. Create and practice an emergency readiness plan for your home or den meeting place.

  8. Visit with a first responder.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AWARD:

  • Learn rescue techniques.

  • Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project.

  • Take a first-aid course.

  • Learn to survive extreme weather situations.

  • Learn about stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

  • Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.

Webelos

Safe & Smart (Elective) 

 (Tiger Handbook, page 226)

  1. Memorize your address, and say it to your den leader or adult partner.

  2. Memorize an emergency contact’s phone number, and say it to your den leader/adult partner.

  3. Take the 911 Safety Quiz

  4. Show you can “Stop, Drop, and Roll.”

  5. Show you know how to safely roll someone else in a blanket to put out a fire.

  6. Make a fire escape map with your adult partner.

  7. Explain your fire escape map, and try a practice fire drill at home.

  8. Find the smoke detectors in your home. With the help of your adult partner, check the batteries.

  9. Visit an emergency responder station, or have an emergency responder visit you.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AWARD:

  1. Cover a family fire plan and drill, and what to do if separated from the family.

  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.

  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.

  4. Working with a first aid instructor from the American Red Cross, Emergency Care and Safety Institute, or American Heart Association go over some basic first aid they feel is appropriate.    Practice how to clean and bandage a cut to your finger and a scrape to your knee.  

  5. Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.

  6. Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Tiger

Every grade level has additional requirements to satisfy their Emergency Preparedness requirements.  Scouts, Scouters & Units can earn this award each year once requirements are completed. Check out the adventure requirements here.

EARNING EMERGENCY

PREPAREDNESS Award

Duty to Country

Council Fire

(Wolf Handbook, page __)

5.  Talk to a military veteran, law enforcement officer, member of the fire department, or someone else who works for the community. Talk about his or her service to the community. After you have visited with the individual, write a short thank-you note.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AWARD: 

  1. Create a checklist to keep your home safe.

  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.

  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.

  4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.

  5. Join a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

  6. Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Wolf

1.  PRACTICE EMERGENCY SKILLS OFTEN. FIRE DRILLS WORK.

2.  FAMILY MEETINGS ARE IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS CHANGES OR UPDATES TO CONTACT INFORMATION FOR EMERGENCY CONTACTS.

3.  UPDATE PICTURES FOR MISSING KIDS KIT EVERY SIX MONTHS. 

4.  TEST & CHANGE SMOKE DETECTOR & CARBON DIOXIDE BATTERIES EVERY YEAR.

5.  ATTEND COMMUNITY EVENTS FOR FIRE SAFETY, 911 KIDS, CONVERSATION WITH THE CHIEF, AND OTHER IMPORTANT EVENTS THAT HELP CITIZENS BE SAFE, INFORMED AND UPDATED ON LOCAL LAWS, ETC. 

6.  CREATE A FAMILY EMERGENCY SURVIVAL KIT, BOX, ETC. GRADUAL AND CONSTANT PREPARATION IS KEY. IT'S DIFFICULT TO PUT IT ALL TOGETHER ALL AT ONCE, BUT LITTLE BY LITTLE, ADDING ESSENTIALS TO THE KIT WILL GO A LONG WAY.

Additional Insights

Duty to Country

Paws for Action 

(Bear Handbook, page __)

  1. Do the following:
    a. Visit a local sheriff’s office or police station, or talk with a law enforcement officer visiting your den. During the visit, take turns with your den members asking questions that will help you learn how to stay safe.
    b. During or after your visit with a law enforcement officer, do at least two of the following:
    i. Practice one way police gather evidence by taking fingerprints, taking a shoe print, or taking tire track casts.
    ii. Make a list of emergency numbers to post in your home, and keep a copy with you in your backpack or wallet.
    iii. With your family, develop a plan to follow in case of an emergency, and practice the plan at least three times. Your family can determine the emergency, or you can develop several plans.
    iv. Discuss with your parent or another adult you trust any worries you have about your safety or a friend’s safety.
    v. If you have younger brothers and sisters, make sure they know how to call for help in an emergency.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AWARD:

  • Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.

  • Learn how to shut off utilities to your home in an emergency.

  • Learn simple rescue techniques.

  • Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.

  • Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.

  • Organize a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

  • Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Bear

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